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Reproductive Rights

Dear Amy,

I'm a 17-year old white male living in southern Louisiana, and I consider myself to be a wholehearted feminist. I've always thought the historical and, in many instances, current oppression of women's rights is and was horrible.   I fervently hope that the feminist movement can continue to elevate women's status in society, while also allowing men to behave in ways considered more traditionally feminine.

Now, I notice that most female feminists are pro-choice in their opinions regarding abortion, and while I can understand where they are coming from in saying that it's a woman's right to choose and make her own decisions, isn't the aborting of a fetus the murder of an unborn child? I just can't ever see how anyone can see this as anything but legal murder.

What I'd like to hear from you though is maybe a different spin on this. What I'm getting at is, can you explain to me why most feminists don't see this the same way that I do? I doubt that anything could ever alter how I feel about this, but I'm always willing listen and hopefully broaden my horizons even more.
   

Actually if you read through some of the notes posted at Ask Amy you will see that there are many feminists who do feel the same way about abortion as you do -- or they have a related problem, which is that they don't know how they feel about the issue and don't want to be responsible for promoting something they don't believe in.

This is all to say that I actually think that it is a very personal issue and even some people who have had abortions believe that it is murder -- but they also see that they don't have any other choice. It's a difficult decision and it's a question of life or potential life -- and what are the consequences. I hope that helps to answer your question and I encourage you to look at other questions and answers posted on the site already.

Good luck,

-- Amy

 

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