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Media

Hi,
this is sort of broad, but I was wondering why girls my age (teens-twenties) don't really seem interested in feminism. Is it because it's such a part of our lives we don't feel a need for a revolution or just apathy? Teens spend billions of dollars a year. If they boycotted a certain company for sexist ads or a concert where girls are getting hurt, etc., they would probably make a change. Why don't they use that power?
Thanks,
Heather

   

Dear Heather,
I think we are on the same wavelength. I actually just co-wrote a book, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism & the Future. Among the things we (my co-author, Jennifer, and I) explore is how our generation (basically anyone born after the mid-60s) was born with feminism in the water, therefore, we often live feminist lives without feeling an obligation to be vocal about it.
This doesn't so much mean that feminism isn't alive, but that it is so alive that it is a part of our lives.

I totally agree, too, about the potential of our earning potential. And, as I've been traveling around the country as a part of my book tour, I have frequently been asked what to do and I usually encourage each group to use their consumer power to feminism's advantage. For instance, one letter to an advertiser protesting a sexist ad might not be effective, but what if each of us in this room collective did something -- then a 100 letters might make them think.

So I think that what you and I can do -- that is two people who are aware of our potential -- is to help galvanize other people's potential. I hope that helps and confirms that you aren't alone in your thinking.

Thanks for writing,
Amy

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