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Media

I am currently writing an article on feminism in films and your feedback would be priceless.

Do you think that the feminist movement has had an impact on the roles of women in film? How have the roles changed? If feminism has created more jobs for women then film roles must surely be the same? But even so, we cannot stop the sexual aspect of women in films, and men still seeing them as sexual objects in a film. Any feedback would be appreciated and a great help. Thank you,

Zara
   

Coincidentally, I'm also in the process of writing an article about women in the film.

Ms. Magazine has recently had two articles on this topic -- one in their summer issue re: documentaries and another a few issues ago more generally. I think that feminists have had an impact on the film industry -- mostly in supporting the burgeoning independent film industry, where roles for women are more honest and accurate and where women have more room to direct, produce and not be sexuality. Feminists have also had an impact on individual actors thus allowing them to refuse roles they don't want to and also to promote their stake in their characters.

I think it's limited an inaccurate to just look at numbers -- directors, producers, etc... -- or even limit women's advancement to how they are or aren't sexualized -- especially since some women want to be sexualized. I think that it's deeper than that -- what is the role of film in our lives and how well can women access the film world and what choices are available to them.

Hope that helps,

- Amy

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