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* STATUE FINALLY MOVED TO THE ROTUNDA! *

UPDATE: AFTER 75 YEARS, THEY ACTUALLY GOT IT UP

Thanks to all the activists who wrote, called, e-mailed and contributed money to moving the suffrage statue from the Capitol basement to the rotunda. The marble statue of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Susan B. Anthony was moved on Mother's Day. The move will be commemorated at a rededication ceremony on June 26. Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL) has introduced a bill (HR52) to commission a statue of Sojourner Truth to join the other suffragists in the rotunda (out of 197 statues in the Capitol, 5 are of women). Right-wing talk radio has played up the absence of Truth to the point that members of Congress report receiving only negative calls about the move. They need to hear from women who know how important this symbol is particularly those who worked hard to overcome obstacles: Sen. John Warner (202-224-2023; fax 202-224-6295, E-mail) and Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun (202-224-2854; fax: 202-228-1318; E-mail), Rep. Connie Morella (202-225-5341; fax 202-225-1389; E-mail ) and Rep. Cynthia McKinney (202-225-1605; fax 202-226-0691; E-mail ). Thank 'em for finally getting it up and urge support for Hastings' bill. (WFF 6/13/97)

The following is a news release reprinted from Abigail's List.

WASHINGTON (Reuter) - Just in time for Mothers' Day, a statue of three suffragettes who fought for women's right to vote was moved to a prominent spot in the Capitol Sunday after 75 years in a basement crypt.

Contrary to reports late Saturday night, the 7 1/2-ton work was still being moved into place in the Capitol Rotunda Sunday afternoon, according to a spokeswoman for the umbrella group that spearheaded the move.

"Our foremothers will join our forefathers on Mothers' Day," said Lori Rivera of the Woman Suffrage Statue Campaign.

The statue of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott will be the first to feature women in the statue-lined Rotunda. Women won the right to vote in the United States in 1920 after passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution.

A coalition of women's groups won congressional approval to move the statue to a more prominent location in the Capitol earlier this year. But black women's groups have protested the move, arguing that the statue should include black abolitionist Sojourner Truth.

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For more on this story, see CNN's article "Even in stone, suffragettes cause a stir on Capitol Hill" at the CNN web site. In addition to background on the statue and the suffragettes being honored, the article links to other Related Sites, including the information featured here at FEMINIST.COM.

FOR BACKGROUND ON THIS STORY, SEE
OUT OF THE BROOM CLOSET, INTO THE ROTUNDA

 

 

 

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